Gender-Based Violence

Interim Findings from the Global Count

Ending Gender-Based Violence, Harassment, and Abuse

In every region in the world, ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse,’ at 48% is the most prominently chosen response to the question, ‘Which three issues are the most critical for you as a person?’.

 

A chart illustrating that 'Ending Gender-Based Violence, Harassment, and Abuse' is the top issue from the Global Count

Issues > Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse, global view

When broken down by region, the Global Count offers us the ability to compare:

  • In Africa, the majority—50.4%—of respondents who answered the question chose ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse’ as the most important issue to them.
    – ‘Education and Youth Empowerment’ was a close second at 44.7%, and ‘Sexual, Reproductive and Parental Health’ at 16.7%.
  • In Asia, most—47% —of respondents who answered the question chose ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse’ as the most important issue to them.
    – ‘Education and Youth Empowerment’ was the second at 27.7%, followed by ‘Civil Rights and Freedoms’ at 22.9%.
  • In Europe, most—48.2%—of respondents who answered the question selected ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse’ as the most important issue to them.
    – ‘Civil Rights and Freedoms’ was the second at 36.5%, followed by ‘Environmental Justice’ at 30.5%.
  • In the Americas, most—43.9%—of respondents who answered the question chose ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse’ as the most important issue to them.
    – ‘Economic and Workers’ Rights’ was the second at 24.7%, followed by ‘Education and Youth Empowerment’ at 21.2%.
  • In Oceania, most—45.8%—of respondents who answered the question chose ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse’ as the most important issue to them.
    – ‘Environmental Justice’ was the second at 24.5%, followed by ‘Civil Rights and Freedoms’ at 16.5%.
A bar chart and table illustrating a regional view of the top issue, Ending Gender-Based Violence, Harassment, and Abuse

Issues > Ending Gender-Based Violence, Harassment and Abuse, regional view

It is interesting to note that in every region around the world, ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse’ is the most prominently chosen issue, but each region’s second and third most prominently chosen issue are different to one another. It paints a picture of the urgency with which we must approach the issue of ending violence, harassment and abuse of women around the globe, and the unity women have on this issue, despite geographic and demographic differences including age, culture, and race.

In Africa, where nearly 60% of the population is under the age of 25, respondents chose ‘Education and Youth Empowerment’ as a close second after ‘Ending Violence, Harassment and Abuse,’ reflecting the evidence and need for improved youth engagement and programming across the continent. According to the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa 2017 Report, young people must be meaningfully involved in the implementation and tracking of the Sustainable Development Goals and the African Union Agenda 2063.

In contrast, in Oceania, which is especially vulnerable to the impacts of the Climate Crisis, ‘Environmental Justice’ was the second most prominently chosen answer. This is again contrasted with the Americas where ‘Economic and Workers’ Rights’ was the second most prominently chosen answer, which gives a nod to the struggle for equal pay, labour protections, and sufficient maternity/ parental leave that have been well publicised in both North and South America.

In every region, (Africa, Asia, Europe the Americas, and Oceania) the majority of respondents —56% globally—chose ‘cultural/social’ as the biggest barrier to advocating or campaigning to end violence. In every region, ‘political’ was chosen as the second biggest barrier. ‘cultural/social’ was chosen instead of ‘educational,’ ‘technological,’ or ‘economic’ options for barriers, meaning respondents are pointing to the cultural and social environment as a promulgation of violence, harassment and abuse. ‘Technological’ was by far the least chosen barrier. Ultimately, this can and should inform the Action Coalition 1 on Ending Gender-based Violence to direct resources on changing cultural and social norms about violence, harassment and abuse.

For example, a woman who lives outside of Lagos, Nigeria, identified that the most important issue for her is ‘Ending Violence, Harassment, and Abuse.’ She identified the ‘social/cultural’ sector as the biggest barrier to the realization of progress on this issue, and listed a radio programme called the Berekete family radio programme as effective in mobilising to end violence, harassment and abuse in her local area.

This example could be used to inform an argument that increasing investments and attention could focus on behaviour change communications, and ensuring programmes like the Berekete family radio programme mentioned can be scaled to drive cultural and social change, changing hearts and minds on the subject of violence.

It also represents the value in listening to the voices of women and gender-diverse people about the issues and barriers that impact their individual progress toward equality and should inform investments and programming in these issue areas. Solutions to the problems that plague women worldwide must be as diverse as the women with the lived experiences, and the contexts in which they live and work. At this global turning point, when human rights authorities are declaring that gender-based violence is as bad as it was 25 years ago, it is time to redefine how global institutions work toward gender equity. Data solutions and investments should be sought, developed, and made on the ground, centering the voices and supporting the individuals and organizations with the deep contextual experience and knowledge to drive change.

The GC has garnered responses from tens of thousands of women and gender-diverse people thus far, illustrating the issues they face on a hyperlocal level, and what organizations and programmes they believe are critical to progress. With the support of an increasing number of networks willing and able to support the campaign, the GC has the potential to scale in the quality, scope and depth of its data. Furthermore, it could be run as an ongoing multi-stakeholder effort to continuously inform, drive and monitor the progress of Action Coalition agendas over the coming years, as women’s needs and perspectives change.

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